About Customer Service

At Undisputed legal Inc., we are consistently striving for excellence by upgrading the process in which we do business. It is our goal to provide each and every client with personal attention, professional service, and exceptional quality. We understand the plight of our clients, whether they need process services, eviction services, court services, subpoena services, skip trace services, or world compliance investigations, which is why we employ the most professional and experienced New York paralegals, process servers, subpoena servers, and skip tracers/investigators in order to ensure each case is completed accurately and efficiently. With an extreme investment to expand and improve our complete operation, we have invested in state-of-the-art technology and offsite storage in order to comply with recent city/federal licensing regulations that require companies to safeguard and secure confidential information. TRUST AND TRANSPARENCY Here at Undisputed Legal Inc., we believe in empowering all of our clients with a clear understanding of the civil rules and laws related to our services. Process Service: While complex, our staff will take the time to review the rules, laws, timelines and options as they pertain to your service of process. We guarantee diligent attempts however we don't guarantee personal service. Our process servers will make all efforts to successfully serve while adhering to requirements imposed by the jurisdictions in which they operate, providing a detailed record of what transpired on each and every attempt. Court Service: All assignments are handled proficiently and in a timely manner with a proven track record by our paralegals. in the event your documents are rejected by the court, our court paralegals will provide you with a detailed summary of what transpired and how to best move forward. Skip Trace/Background Check: Our skip tracers are able to locate successfully 90% of the time however, there are special circumstances which will effect the results of a skip trace such as, subject being incarcerated, subject has no utilities in his/her name, subject has no social security number, or has relocated overseas. We understand the process can be overwhelming and frustrating which is why transparency is so important.

Who is covered by a Protection Order?

By: Undisputed Legal/Family Court Process Service Department

Persons covered by a Protection Order include the victim, minor children of the victim, and designated household or family members.  These people will be referred to as “the victim”. The alleged abuser will be referred to as “the defendant”.

The Structure of Appellate Courts

By: Undisputed Legal/Court Service Department

Court of Appeals: The Court of Appeals is the highest court in the state. As the state’s court of last resort, the Court of Appeals hears appeals from the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court. The court has seven judges, six associate judges and the chief judge. Court of Appeals judges are appointed for 14-year terms by the governor who must make an appointment from a list of seven “well-qualified” candidates submitted by the bipartisan 12-member Commission on Judicial Nominations. The New York State Senate must also confirm the nomination. 

Who’s Who’s In New York Family Court

JUDGES: A judge is in charge of the hearing (trial). Judges listen to witnesses, examine evidence, and then decide whether the case has been proven. 

SUPPORT MAGISTRATES: A support magistrate hears support cases (petitions seeking monetary support for a child or spouse) and paternity cases (petitions to declare someone to be the child’s father). 

COURT ATTORNEY REFEREES: Court attorney referees hear and issue orders in custody, visitation, and foster-care cases. 

PETITIONER: A petitioner is the person or agency filing the petition. A petition is a written request to the court to make a decision. 

RESPONDENT: The respondent is the person or agency against whom the petition is filed. 

What You Need To Know About New York Family Court

The Family Court of the State of New York has the authority to decide cases affecting the lives of children and families. The court has a wide range of powers to fit the needs of the people who come before it.

The Family Court Act gives the Family Court power to hear certain types of cases. Each case filed is given its own identifying number, called a “docket number.”

The docket number begins with a letter that identifies the type of case filed:

Notice To Quit In Connecticut

Eviction Process in Connecticut

The first step in the Summary Process (Eviction) procedure is the Notice to Quit Possession. The form you must use for the Notice to Quit, which the court will provide upon request, must be completed with the exact name and address, including the apartment number, floor number or other designation, if any, of each adult tenant you want to evict and must be signed by you as the plaintiff/landlord. There must be an original Notice to Quit Possession and sufficient additional copies for each tenant who lives there. You should also keep 1 (one) copy for your own records.

You must state a reason on the Notice to Quit. The most frequently used reasons for evictions are non-payment of rent and termination of lease by lapse of time. Evictions for other reasons may be more complex.

What is Temporary Child Support?

Temporary child support is based upon the respective incomes of the parties as adjusted by any temporary maintenance. If temporary maintenance is to be paid to a party, then, for the purpose of computing child support, the maintenance paid reduces the income of the payor and increases by the same amount the income of the payee. That is why temporary maintenance is computed before temporary child support.

For information on serving child support papers visit www.undisputedlegal.com.  Open Monday – Friday 8am-8pm.  “When you want it done right the first time” contact undisputedlegal.com

Who can I Turn to For Domestic Violence Help?

In a crisis situation, a call to the police is a good place to start. Many people complain that police do not take accusations of domestic violence seriously. That can be true in some circumstances, but on the whole, police are treating domestic violence situations more seriously, and police officers are receiving increased training on the subject. 

The local state attorney or district attorney also may be able to offer some help. An increasing number of hospitals, crisis intervention programs, domestic violence shelters, and social service agencies have programs to help victims of domestic violence. Agencies offering help in cases of domestic violence might be found on any search engine under “Domestic Violence Help,” “Human Services Organizations,” or “Crisis Intervention.” 

If one is working with an attorney in connection with a divorce, the attorney also should be able to initiate the appropriate legal proceedings. 

For information on serving legal papers visit www.undisputedlegal.com.  Open Monday – Friday 8am-8pm.  “When you want it done right the first time” contact undisputedlegal.com

CAN I SUE FOR DAMAGES RELATED TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

In 1994 Congress enacted the Violence Against Women Act. The more formal title of the new law is the Civil Rights Remedies for Gender Motivated Violence Act. Prior to this statute, laws against domestic violence were almost exclusively at the state level. 

The Violence Against Women Act allows a person to sue for damages if another person “commits a crime of violence motivated by gender.” The new law is part of the federal government’s civil rights statute. If the crime of violence constitutes a felony against the person or the property of the victim, the victim can sue the assailant for both compensatory damages and punitive damages. 

Compensatory damages are designed to compensate the victim for the loss. The damages could include medical expenses, lost wages, pain, and suffering. Punitive damages are an added amount of damages not for the purpose of compensation but rather for the purpose of punishing the assailant and deterring future abusive conduct. Punitive damages, however, are still paid to the victim. 

STATE LAWS ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

In recent years, state legislatures and courts have been paying increasing attention to domestic violence. Many states have elaborate laws designed to protect individuals from domestic violence by their spouses, other family members, and people with whom the victim may have had a social relationship. 

A common remedy is for a court to issue an order of protection (also known as a protective order) that orders the alleged abuser to stop abusing or harassing someone else. In addition, the orders often will direct the abuser to stay away from the spouse, the spouse’s home, or place of work. If the person continues to abuse his or her spouse (or another person protected by the order), the abuser can be charged with a criminal violation of the order in addition to being charged with other offenses, such as assault and battery. Penalties include fines and incarceration. 

The domestic violence statutes in most states apply not only to physical attacks, but also to other types of conduct. Some examples of conduct that could be considered domestic violence: creating disturbance at a spouse’s place of work, placing harassing telephone calls, stalking, using surveillance, and making threats against a spouse or family member (even though the threat may not have been carried out).