Posts made in May 2014

How Lethal Injection Works

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By Kevin Bonsor

For thousands of years, many governments have punished people convicted of certain crimes by putting them to death, using various means to accomplish this. The death penalty is considered by many to be the ultimate form of punishment for those who have committed society’s most heinous crimes, including rape and murder. As times have changed, so have the methods of execution. Continue reading

Five myths about Brown v. Board of Education

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By Imani Perry

Imani Perry, the author of “More Beautiful and More Terrible: The Embrace and Transcendence of Racial Inequality in the United States,” is a professor of African American studies at Princeton University.

In the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education opinion, the Supreme Court declared that state laws requiring segregation in public schools were unconstitutional. But change didn’t come easily, nor are schools all that integrated today. Sixty years after Brown, let’s examine some myths about the landmark court decision.

Continue reading

60 Years Later, Reflections On Brown vs. Board of Education

“Life is not what one lived, but what one remembers and how one remembers in order to recount it.” — Gabriel García Márquez

I was born at the end of the great depression during Jim Crow and came of age in Baltimore during the Civil Rights Movement.

Throughout my childhood, everything was segregated, but as a little girl I didn’t realize there was anything inherently wrong with this system. Continue reading

50 simple ways you can market your practice

By Stephanie Francis Ward

You can spend a lot of money on legal marketing, but you don’t need to. Nor do you have to be naturally outgoing or charming. What is necessary for good business development, say successful lawyers and consultants who shared their strategies with the ABA Journal, is a marketing plan focused on activities you do well, targeted at the right audience and carried out consistently. Give it some time, they say, and business will come. Continue reading

352 new laws take effect in Utah

By Lee Davidson

At the stroke of midnight Tuesday morning, 352 new laws take effect in Utah.

Panhandling along state highways will be outlawed. So will “revenge porn,” spying by drones without a warrant and dialing or texting with a cellphone while driving. The new laws also will allow many things that had been banned.

More 80-mph speed limits will soon sprout up on state freeways. Some counties will allow election-day voter registration and online voting. People will be able to try out hunting without first completing hunter-education classes.

And plenty of new regulations are coming, too. Continue reading

China’s Copyright Laws. A Very Useful Primer, With A Music Twist.

By Dan Harris

The China Music Business Blog (who knew?) just did a post by University of Oregon Law School Professor Eric Priest. Priest’s bio notes that he previously “worked in the Chinese music industry as a consultant, entrepreneur, and producer.”

Priest’s post (paper) is entitled, Making Amends: China Music Copyright Law Primer, and it is broken out into the following sections:

  • The Development of PRC Copyright Law
  • Copyright Law Since China’s Entry into the WTO
  • Copyright Enforcement—Administrative and Judicial Enforcement Routes
  • Internet Enforcement

Continue reading

How to Find the Best Person in Your Firm for Business Development

By Stephen Fairley

If you are a solo practitioner or in a small firm, when it comes to delegating business development efforts to your staff, your only choices may be to ask a paralegal, your assistant or  receptionist to support you.

If this sounds like your situation, here are some critical questions to ask to help you decide on which staff member is in the best position to support your business development efforts or whether you need to go to “Plan B”: Continue reading

How Money Laundering Works

By Julia Layton

In October 2005, U.S. congressman Tom DeLay was indicted on money laundering charges, forcing him to step down as House Majority Leader. Money laundering is a serious charge — in 2001, U.S. prosecutors obtained almost 900 money-laundering convictions with an average prison sentence of six years. The rise of global financial markets makes money laundering easier than ever — countries with bank-secrecy laws are directly connected to countries with bank-reporting laws, making it possible to anonymously deposit “dirty” money in ­one country and then have it transferred to any other country for use. ­

Money lau­ndering happens in almost every country in the world, and a single scheme typically involves transferring money through several countries in order to obscure its origins. In this article, we’ll learn exactly what money laundering is and why it’s necessary, who launders money and how they do it and what steps the authorities are taking to try to foil money-laundering operations. Continue reading

New Laws – New York State 2014

Business Tax Cuts, Family Tax Relief, Health Care Measures Among New Laws Taking Effect

Hundreds of thousands of small businesses and manufacturers in New York will see a reduction in their state taxes as a result of new tax cuts that take effect on January 1, 2014. In addition, tax relief for hardworking, middle class families, new health care protections, and the START-UP NY economic development program are among the new state laws that take effect on New Year’s Day. Continue reading

California DMV Reminds Motorists of New 2014 Laws

SACRAMENTO — With 2014 just around the corner, the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) is reminding motorists of some of the new laws that will become effective in the new year. The following laws go into effect on January 1, 2014, unless otherwise noted.

Bicycles: Passing Distance. AB 1371 (Bradford), known as the Three Feet for Safety Act, will require a motor vehicle driver passing a bicycle that is proceeding in the same direction to pass with no less than 3 feet between any part of the vehicle and any part of the bicycle or driver. When three feet is not possible, the motor vehicle must slow to a reasonable and prudent speed and only pass when no danger is present to the bicyclist. Failing to do so can incur a fine, regardless of a collision or not.This law will take effect September 16, 2014. Continue reading