Estate Planning

What Is A Trust And How Does it Work?

By: Undisputed Legal Inc./Court Service Department

A trust is a legal instrument used to hold and manage real property and tangible or intangible personal property, for example, antiques (tangible personal property) or the right to royalty payments (intangible personal property). Putting stuff in trust transfers it from your private ownership to the ownership of a legal entity called a “trust,” which holds the property for your benefit or the benefit of anyone else you might name. Upon transfer, the law looks at these assets as if the trust owned them. Many trusts are set up in wills and take effect upon death. Others can be established while you are still alive. 

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Do I have to have a lawyer to write my will?

By: Undisputed Legal/Court Service Department

No. If your will meets the legal requirements established by your state’s law, it is valid, whether or not you wrote it with a lawyer’s help. However, a lawyer can help ensure that your will is more than just valid. Your lawyer can make sure that the will does what you really want it to do. For this reason, more than 85 percent of Americans who have wills worked with a lawyer. 

For information on serving legal papers, click here or call (800) 774-6922. Representatives are available Monday-Friday 8 am – 8 pm EST.  If you found this article helpful, please consider donating.  Thank you for following our blog, A space dedicated to bringing you news on breaking legal developments, interesting articles for law professionals, and educational material for all. We hope that you enjoy your time on our blog and revisit us!  We also invite you to check out our Frequently Asked Questions About Process Servers by clicking here.

Does a will cover all my property?


By: Undisputed Legal/Court Service Department

Probably not. It is easy to think that a will covers all of your property. But because property can be passed to others by gift, contract, joint tenancy, life insurance, or other methods, a will might best be viewed as just one of many ways of determining how and to whom your estate will be distributed at your death. 

The various methods of distributing your estate are discussed in this chapter. In the meantime, keep in mind the kinds of property that a will may not cover and include them in your estate planning. 

For information on serving legal papers, click here or call (800) 774-6922. Representatives are available Monday-Friday 8 am – 8 pm EST.  If you found this article helpful, please consider donating.  Thank you for following our blog, A space dedicated to bringing you news on breaking legal developments, interesting articles for law professionals, and educational material for all. We hope that you enjoy your time on our blog and revisit us!  We also invite you to check out our Frequently Asked Questions About Process Servers by clicking here.

Who gets my property if I die without a will?

By: Undisputed Legal/Court Service Department

By not leaving a valid will or trust, or by not transferring your property in some other way before death, you’ve left it to the law of your state to write your “will” for you. In the absence of a will, your state’s direction has made individual judgments about who should receive a decedent’s property. Those judgments may or may not bear any relationship to the judgments you would have made if you had prepared a will or executed a trust. 

As a general rule, state law gives your property to the persons most closely related to you by blood, marriage, or adoption. As a result, your hard-earned money might end up with relatives who don’t need it, while others, whether related to you, who might need be in greater need, or who is more deserving, are passed over. In the unlikely event that you have no relatives or if your relatives cannot be located after diligent efforts, your property will go to the state, a big reason to have a will or trust. 

For information on serving legal papers, click here or call (800) 774-6922. Representatives are available Monday-Friday 8 am – 8 pm EST.  If you found this article helpful, please consider donating.  Thank you for following our blog, A space dedicated to bringing you news on breaking legal developments, interesting articles for law professionals, and educational material for all. We hope that you enjoy your time on our blog and revisit us!  We also invite you to check out our Frequently Asked Questions About Process Servers by clicking here.