History of the Miranda Rule 

By: Undisputed Legal/Court Service Department

  1. Police questioned arrested person at police station for four hours until he confessed. The court was concerned about psychological coercion. Escobedo v. Illinois, 378 U.S. 478 (1964).
  2. Officers agreed to drop some charges if suspect would confess to kidnaping. Suspect agreed and confessed. He was convicted of kidnapping and rape. Conviction overturned by court. Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436 (1966).
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