Posts tagged with "Adoption"

Adoption in New York State

In New York State, most adoption petitions are filed in the county where the adoptive parents live. Depending on the county, the Family Court or the Surrogate’s Court decide adoption cases.

A Family Court or Surrogate’s Court Judge must approve all adoptions. This is done by signing an Order of Adoption.

There are two kinds of adoptions in New York, agency adoptions and private placement adoptions. The procedure is a little different between the two types of adoptions.

Most adoptions are of children under the age of 18.

Name Change In New York State

In New York State, you have the right to adopt any name you wish by using that name for everything in your life. This does not apply to children or prison inmates. But, it may be better to legally change your name because most government agencies will not accept your name change without a court order.

You can ask the court to legally change the name you were given at birth, adoption or marriage

Name Change Basics

To ask the Court to change your name or your child’s name, you need to give the Court the following:

  • court papers asking for the change, this includes: Name Change Petition and Proposed Order. The petition must be filled out and signed in front of a Notary Public. You may need additional forms to change a child’s name. You may also need to give a self-addressed, stamped business-size envelope to the Court
  • proof of birth
  • court fee ($210 in Supreme and County Courts; $65.00 in New York City Civil Court)
  • in Supreme Court you must also submit a Request for Judicial Intervention (RJI) to have a Judge assigned to the case. There is no fee to file this form.
  • depending on your situation there may be additional papers that you need to give the court.

Who’s Who’s In New York Family Court

JUDGES: A judge is in charge of the hearing (trial). Judges listen to witnesses, examine evidence, and then decide whether the case has been proven. 

SUPPORT MAGISTRATES: A support magistrate hears support cases (petitions seeking monetary support for a child or spouse) and paternity cases (petitions to declare someone to be the child’s father). 

COURT ATTORNEY REFEREES: Court attorney referees hear and issue orders in custody, visitation, and foster-care cases. 

PETITIONER: A petitioner is the person or agency filing the petition. A petition is a written request to the court to make a decision. 

RESPONDENT: The respondent is the person or agency against whom the petition is filed. 

What You Need To Know About New York Family Court

The Family Court of the State of New York has the authority to decide cases affecting the lives of children and families. The court has a wide range of powers to fit the needs of the people who come before it.

The Family Court Act gives the Family Court power to hear certain types of cases. Each case filed is given its own identifying number, called a “docket number.”

The docket number begins with a letter that identifies the type of case filed:

Adoption, What You Need To Know

Single-parent adoptions. Single persons may adopt children, although some agencies strongly prefer to place a child with a married couple. Other agencies particularly those dealing with children who might be hard to place are willing to place a child with a single person. Single-parent adoptions usually are possible in private adoptions. 

As with adoptions sought by a couple, a single person who seeks to adopt a child must be approved by a social service investigator and show that appropriate arrangements have been made for care of the child. 

Adoption by lesbian or gay couples. Some states-including New York and California-allow gay and lesbian couples to adopt a child. Other states do not allow such adoptions, and many states have laws that are unclear regarding whether it is permissible for two persons of the same sex to adopt a child. 

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