Posts tagged with "Divorce"

Divorce And Deciding Whether To Go To Trial

By: Undisputed Legal/Divorce Process Service Department

The decision of whether or not to go to trial and to have a judge decide contested issues often involves a cost-benefit analysis. If the financial benefit that may be received from going to trial is high compared to the cost of going to trial, it may make sense to go to trial. For example, if wife and husband dispute the value of a business started by the husband during the marriage and the difference in their valuations is substantial, then it may make sense to let a judge decide the issue rather than give in to an unreasonable valuation by the other side. 

AFTER THE DIVORCE JUDGMENT HAS BEEN SIGNED BY THE COURT

The Judgment of Divorce (Form UD-11) needs to be filed and entered in the County Clerk’s Office. The manner in which this occurs depends upon the procedure of the county in which you brought the action. Consult the Supreme Court Clerk’s Office for information regarding your obligations for the retrieval and/or entry of the signed judgment and supporting papers. Should you receive notice that the papers have been filed on your behalf by the court, or if you file the papers, you may go to the County Clerk’s Office to obtain a certified copy of the judgment. You must bring identification with you, because matrimonial files are confidential and information will be released only to a party or his or her attorney. The certified copy will cost between $4.00 and $10.00, but the fee will be waived if you obtained a poor person waiver. A copy of the judgment of divorce must be served on the Defendant. To do this, you must have served on the Defendant a copy of the signed and entered Judgment of Divorce (Form UD-11), together with the completed Notice of Entry (Form UD-14). Service by mail is sufficient. You should ask the Process Server who serves the Judgment of Divorce with Notice of Entry to sign the Affidavit of Service of Judgment of Divorce (Form UD-15) before a Notary Public. A copy of the Judgment of Divorce and Notice of Entry must be attached to the signed and notarized Affidavit of Service. Keep the Affidavit with your important papers. 

For information on Serving Divorce Papers visit www.undisputedlegal.com.  Open Monday – Friday 8am-8pm.  “When you want it done right the first time” contact undisputedlegal.com

STEPS FOR PLACING YOUR DIVORCE CASE ON THE COURT CALENDAR

After you have completed Steps 1-7, you are ready to place your case on the court’s calendar. If the Defendant consents to the action by signing the Affidavit of Defendant (Form UD-7), you may place your case on the court’s calendar immediately. Otherwise, you will have to wait until 40 days after the date of the service of the summons. 

You must complete the following steps to place your case on the calendar: 

STEP 8: You must complete Forms UD-3 through UD-12 (include UD-7 only if signed by the Defendant). Form UD-3 (Affidavit of Service) and Form UD-4 (Sworn Statement of Removal of Barriers to Remarriage) need not be completed, or filed, if the Defendant has signed Form UD-7 (Affidavit of Defendant) and checked Box 6b on the form, Form UD-8(3) Child Support Worksheet, Form UD-8a (Support Collection Unit Information Sheet) and Form UD-8b (Qualified Medical Child Support Order) need not be completed, or filed, if there are no un- emancipated children of the marriage. Form UD-8(2) (Maintenance Guidelines Worksheet) need not be completed or filed or if neither party seeks maintenance as payee under the Maintenance Guidelines Law. Form UD-8(1) (Annual Income Worksheet) is not required if neither party seeks maintenance or child support. 

Steps To Start A Divorce Action In New York

By: Undisputed Legal/Family Court Process Service Department

STEP 1. Prepare an original and two copies of the Summons With Notice (Form UD-1) or the Summons and Verified Complaint (Form UD-1a and Form UD-2).

STEP 2.Purchase an index number at the County Clerk’s Office and file the original of the Summons With Notice or the original of the Summons and Verified Complaint with the County Clerk. Unless you are granted a poor person’s waiver, you will be required to pay $210 for the index number. Check with the County Clerk regarding acceptable forms of payment. Many County Clerks also will require that you fill out an Index Number Application Form at the time of filing, so be sure to bring with you the names, addresses and telephone numbers of all of the attorneys or, if unrepresented, of the parties themselves.

How much is a divorce, without a lawyer?

By: Undisputed Legal/Family Court Process Services Department

Usually, the total fees will be approximately $400, as follows:

  • Starting the case: It costs $210 to buy a case Index Number at your County Clerk’s Office to start a New York State divorce case. 
  • Later in the case: Other fees totaling approximately $160 will have to be paid. These additional fees will be described as you follow the steps in this booklet.
  • At the end of the case: If the court grants the divorce, several other fees will have to paid for certain legal papers showing that the divorce was approved. These costs vary from county to county, but will roughly total $5-$30.

Who’s Who’s In New York Family Court

JUDGES: A judge is in charge of the hearing (trial). Judges listen to witnesses, examine evidence, and then decide whether the case has been proven. 

SUPPORT MAGISTRATES: A support magistrate hears support cases (petitions seeking monetary support for a child or spouse) and paternity cases (petitions to declare someone to be the child’s father). 

COURT ATTORNEY REFEREES: Court attorney referees hear and issue orders in custody, visitation, and foster-care cases. 

PETITIONER: A petitioner is the person or agency filing the petition. A petition is a written request to the court to make a decision. 

RESPONDENT: The respondent is the person or agency against whom the petition is filed. 

CAN I BE RESPONSIBLE FOR CHILD SUPPORT AS A STEPPARENT?

The responsibilities of a stepparent depend on state law. A stepparent usually is not required to pay child support for a spouse’s child from another marriage, unless the stepparent has adopted the child. Until then, the child’s biological parents are liable for the child’s support. Some states, however, make stepparents liable for the stepchild’s support as long as the stepparent and stepchild are living together. 

A stepparent who does not adopt a spouse’s child normally may not claim custody of the child if the marriage ends in divorce, although some states allow a stepparent to seek visitation. 

A stepchild usually does not share in the estate of a stepparent, unless the stepparent has provided for the stepchild in a will. However, an unmarried stepchild under eighteen may receive supplemental retirement benefits or survivor’s benefits under Social Security. 

For information on serving legal papers visit www.undisputedlegal.com.  Open Monday – Friday 8am-8pm.  “When you want it done right the first time” contact undisputedlegal.com

FACTORS IN DETERMINING CHILD CUSTODY

There is no one factor that is invariably “the” most important factor in a custody case. The importance of a particular factor will vary with the facts of each case. If one parent in a custody dispute has a major problem with alcoholism or mental illness or has abused the child, that of course could be the deciding factor. 

If neither parent has engaged in unusually bad conduct, the most important factor often is which parent has been primarily responsible for taking care of the child on a day-to-day basis. Some states refer to this as the primary caretaker factor. If one parent can show that he or she took care of the child most of the time, that parent usually will be favored for custody, particularly if the child is young (under approximately eight years old). 

CHILD CUSTODY -IS THERE A PREFERENCE FOR MOTHERS OVER FATHERS?

Under the current law of almost all states, mothers and fathers have an equal right to custody. Courts are not supposed to assume that a child is automatically better off with the mother or the father. In a contested custody case, both the father and mother have an equal burden of proving to the court that it is in the best interest of the child that the child be in his or her custody. 

There are a few states (mostly in the South) that have laws providing that if everything else is equal, the mother may be preferred; but in those states, many fathers have been successful in obtaining custody, even if the mother is a fit parent. 

In some states, courts say that mothers and fathers are to be considered equally, but the courts then go on to hold that it is permissible to consider the age or sex of the child when deciding custody. That usually translates to a preference for mothers if the child is young or female. But, again, it is possible for fathers in those states to gain custody, even when the mother is fit. 

Custody/Visitation After Divorce

Child custody is the right and duty to care for a child on a day-to-day basis and to make major decisions about the child. 

In sole custody arrangements, one parent takes care of the child most of the time and makes major decisions about the child. That parent usually is called the custodial parent. The other parent generally is referred to as the noncustodial parent. The noncustodial parent almost always has a right of visitation a right to be with the child, including for overnight visits and vacation periods. 

In joint custody arrangements, both parents share in making major decisions, and both parents also might spend substantial amounts of time with the child.