Posts tagged with "how to evict"

HOW TO EVICT IN NEW YORK CITY – NON-PAYMENT PROCEEDINGS

The Housing Court hears and decides disputes between residential landlords and tenants in New York City. These cases include summary nonpayment and holdover proceedings, proceedings to enforce housing maintenance standards, and harassment cases. 

The Housing Court is separated into Parts. A Housing Judge presides in each Part. There is a special part, called the HP Part, that hears only cases brought by tenants or by New York City to enforce laws requiring repairs in residential buildings. All other cases are first assigned to a Resolution Part. Visit the Resolution Part page to learn more about what happens in a Resolution Part. If the case cannot be resolved between the parties and if it is ready for a trial, it is assigned to a Trial Part. The judge in the Trial Part will listen to all the evidence and decide the case. 

How To Evict A Month To Month Tenant In New York

By: Undisputed Legal/Eviction Service Department

Renters who do not have leases and pay rent on a monthly basis are called “month-to-month” tenants. In localities without rent regulation, tenants who stay past the end of a lease are treated as month-to-month tenants if the landlord accepts their rent (Real Property Law § 232-c).

A month-to-month tenancy outside New York City may be terminated by either party by giving at least one month’s notice before the expiration of the tenancy. For example, if the landlord wants the tenant to move out by November 1 and the rent is due on the first of each month, the landlord must give notice by September 30. In New York City, 30 days’ notice is required, rather than one month.

Landlords do not need to explain why the tenancy is being terminated, they only need to provide notice that it is, and that refusal to vacate will lead to eviction proceedings. Such notice does not automatically allow the landlord to evict the tenant. A landlord may raise the rent of a month-to-month tenant with the consent of the tenant. If the tenant does not consent, however, the landlord can terminate the tenancy by giving appropriate notice. (Real Property Law § 232-a and § 232-b).

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