Posts tagged with "uncontested Divorce"

STEPS TO START THE DIVORCE ACTION IN NEW YORK

By: Undisputed Legal/Family Court Process Service Department

STEP 1. Prepare an original and two copies of the Summons With Notice (Form UD-1) or the Summons and Verified Complaint (Form UD-1a and Form UD-2).

STEP 2.Purchase an index number at the County Clerk’s Office and file the original of the Summons With Notice or the original of the Summons and Verified Complaint with the County Clerk. Unless you are granted a poor person’s waiver, you will be required to pay $210 for the index number. Check with the County Clerk regarding acceptable forms of payment. Many County Clerks also will require that you fill out an Index Number Application Form at the time of filing, so be sure to bring with you the names, addresses and telephone numbers of all of the attorneys or, if unrepresented, of the parties themselves.

How much is a divorce, without a lawyer?

By: Undisputed Legal/Family Court Process Services Department

Usually, the total fees will be approximately $400, as follows:

  • Starting the case: It costs $210 to buy a case Index Number at your County Clerk’s Office to start a New York State divorce case. 
  • Later in the case: Other fees totaling approximately $160 will have to be paid. These additional fees will be described as you follow the steps in this booklet.
  • At the end of the case: If the court grants the divorce, several other fees will have to paid for certain legal papers showing that the divorce was approved. These costs vary from county to county, but will roughly total $5-$30.

How Divorce Works

By Lee Ann Obringer

Chances are, we all know someone who is divorced — probably several someones. In 2000, there were over 957,200 finalized divorces in the United States. The U.S. Census Bureau says that 50 percent of all marriages entered into today will end in divorce. That’s a lot of broken homes, heartaches and paperwork, not to mention money spent on attorney fees and court costs.

But, some say those percentages of future doomed marriages have to be interpreted based on other factors. Barbara Whitehead and David Popenoe’s “The State of Our Unions” (2004), which was prepared at Rutgers University for the National Marriage Project, says that there are several important social factors that affect that 50 percent estimate. For example, your risk of divorce decreases by: Continue reading