Women in the Criminal Justice System

By: Tricia Hussung

CTX_CJwomenSeeing female police officers, lawyers, corrections officers and judges is a common occurrence these days. However, women working in the criminal justice system is a relatively new trend. It wasn’t long ago that this was quite rare. In fact, in 1872 the Supreme Court ruled against allowing a woman, Myra Bradwell, to practice law. It wasn’t until the 20th century, especially after the middle of the century, that the number of women in law enforcement significantly increased. 

According to the National Center for Women and Policing, female police officers doubled in number during the 1950s alone.  After that, it was only a matter of time until more women became criminal justice professionals. In 1968, two women in Indianapolis were the first to ever go on patrol duty. And the Civil Rights Act was expanded in the year 1972, stating that women could no longer be discriminated against by police departments. By 1992, half of all law students were women, and as a result more became judges. Now, about 30 percent of trial and district court judges in the United States are women, according to the National Women’s Law Center.

Women Today

According to recent U.S. Census Bureau statistics, employment of women in the criminal justice system is impressive. The following data illustrates the important role that women play in all aspects of law enforcement, the courts, corrections and more. As of the year 2011 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), there are:

  • 206,298 women employed as security guards and gaming officers (22 percent)
  • 37,224 women who are detectives and criminal investigators (26 percent)
  • 9,656 women working as firefighters (3.5 percent)
  • 117,015 women employed as bailiffs and correctional officers (27 percent)
  • 110,670 women who are police officers and sheriffs (16 percent)

Influential Women in Criminal Justice

Both in the past and present, women have made a difference in the criminal justice field. Below is a list of women who are great role models for individuals who are just starting their criminal justice career. You can follow them on Twitter and Facebook to get updates on the criminal justice field and how they are shaping decisions related to policy and law.

  • Sandra Day O’Connor: As the first woman to serve as a United States Supreme Court justice, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. O’Connor served as a justice from 1981 through 2006. When she first became an attorney, she had to work as a secretary because no law firms would hire a woman. O’Connor later served in the Arizona Legislature and Court of Appeals.
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg: She is currently serving as a Supreme Court Justice and was appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993. After O’Connor, Ginsburg is the second female justice. Her past career highlights include working as an advocate for the advancement of women’s rights and volunteering as a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union.
  • Janet Reno: She was the first female U.S. attorney general and the longest serving during the 20th century. Reno graduated from Harvard Law School, one of only 16 women in her class of 500. Before serving as attorney general, Reno was state attorney in Miami, Florida.
  • Freda AdlerAs one of the most influential criminologists in the world, Adler served as president of the American Criminological Society and has been a consultant for the United Nations on issues related to crime. She is currently serving as professor emeritus at Rutgers University and as visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania.
  • Gloria AllredShe is a high-profile American lawyer who generally works on cases related to the protection of women’s rights. Her most famous client was the family of Nicole Brown Simpson during the O.J. Simpson trial. In fact, her law firm handles more women’s rights cases than any other private firm in the U.S.
This entry was posted in Law, Legal, Legal Material, News and tagged , , , , , on by .

About Customer Service

At Undisputed legal Inc., we are consistently striving for excellence by upgrading the process in which we do business. It is our goal to provide each and every client with personal attention, professional service, and exceptional quality. We understand the plight of our clients, whether they need process services, eviction services, court services, subpoena services, skip trace services, or world compliance investigations, which is why we employ the most professional and experienced New York paralegals, process servers, subpoena servers, and skip tracers/investigators in order to ensure each case is completed accurately and efficiently. With an extreme investment to expand and improve our complete operation, we have invested in state-of-the-art technology and offsite storage in order to comply with recent city/federal licensing regulations that require companies to safeguard and secure confidential information. TRUST AND TRANSPARENCY Here at Undisputed Legal Inc., we believe in empowering all of our clients with a clear understanding of the civil rules and laws related to our services. Process Service: While complex, our staff will take the time to review the rules, laws, timelines and options as they pertain to your service of process. We guarantee diligent attempts however we don't guarantee personal service. Our process servers will make all efforts to successfully serve while adhering to requirements imposed by the jurisdictions in which they operate, providing a detailed record of what transpired on each and every attempt. Court Service: All assignments are handled proficiently and in a timely manner with a proven track record by our paralegals. in the event your documents are rejected by the court, our court paralegals will provide you with a detailed summary of what transpired and how to best move forward. Skip Trace/Background Check: Our skip tracers are able to locate successfully 90% of the time however, there are special circumstances which will effect the results of a skip trace such as, subject being incarcerated, subject has no utilities in his/her name, subject has no social security number, or has relocated overseas. We understand the process can be overwhelming and frustrating which is why transparency is so important.

5 thoughts on "Women in the Criminal Justice System"

Ng says:

The justice system in USA is pathetic. There are people here that do MORE TIME for selling drugs than PUNCHING or kicking or TORTURING disabled people. F this county. F this system. It’s corrupt. And it’s totally understandable why people of color are disgusted and angry. I’m a person of Asian Descent. My grandfather was punched and kicked in a nursing home. ANd yet the perpetrators got NO PRISON TIME> F this justice system. And yet we hear over and over about people getting hard time for much less evil things. I hate this country.

18768920 says:

I understand your frustration & partially share your sentiments, however when things are broken its time to fix them. This can be accomplished in many ways, one of which is, social media is one of the biggest platforms to date. Share your experiences and pose a solution. Thanks for sharing.

Maryjo says:

It works very well for me

Thanks for sharing, The purpose of our blog is to inform all on the services we provide, in order to assist in making a decision from a position of strength. If you find the information useful I invite you to share your experience by clicking on the link https://www.google.com/maps/place/Undisputed+Legal+Inc/@40.7622432,-73.9751823,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0xb8c541a381540890!8m2!3d40.7622432!4d-73.9729936

Lea says:

Thanks, it’s very informative

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *