Child Support

How To Modify Your Child Support Order In New York

By: Akanksha A. Panicker

New York takes child support seriously. There are strong mechanisms in place to enforce child support. In fact, if the custodial parent does not know where the noncustodial parent or putative (alleged) father lives,  the last known address and place of employment of the parent will be contacted in an attempt to locate the parent. Additional Federal or state resources may also be used in this endeavor. New York also has expedited contempt proceedings for noncustodial parents in violation of child support. 

In order to understand how modifying child support orders in New York works, it must be understood that the standard support obligation in New York is always based on a statutory calculation. However, the discretion of the court is ultimately what decided an appropriate child support amount, and can modify the amount based on the cost of living or unforeseen circumstances. 

PATERNITY QUESTIONS: HOW TO NAVIGATE LEGAL FATHERHOOD

By: Akanksha A. Panicker

[1.1] EXPLAINING A PATERNITY CASE

It’s easy enough to identify a child’s birth mother, but what about paternity? A child born to parents not married to each other is considered not to have a legal father, unless the biological father signs an ‘Acknowledgement of Paternity.’ This is usually done at the hospital at the time of the child’s birth. 

So, what exactly happens? 

Voluntary Acknowledgment of Paternity (AOP) is a legal process through which paternity, or legal fatherhood, can be established. The father declares himself to be the child’s father, entering an ‘Order of Filiation’ which essentially is a court order declaring legal parenthood. A petition can be filed in Family Court seeking the same. 

Paternity establishment ultimately is just the process of determining the legal father of a child. In New York, unmarried parents can establish paternity by [A.] signing a voluntary Acknowledgment of Paternity form; or [B.]by petitioning a court to determine paternity. The Acknowledgement of Paternity form is available from hospitals, local district child support offices, and local birth registrars.

HOW TO FILE FOR CHILD SUPPORT IN NEW YORK STATE

Child Support Blocks

Under New York State law, both parents must financially support their child until the child turns 21 years old. Child support also includes providing health insurance coverage until the child turns 21 years old.

If the child is under 21 and married, self-supporting, or in the military then the child is emancipated and the parents don’t have to support the child.

 About Child Support

In general, the custodial parent can get child support from the other parent, the non-custodial parent. The custodial parent is the parent who has physical custody of the child. This means that the child lives with this parent most of the time.

  • If the two parents were never married to each other, there must be an Acknowledgment of Paternity or Order of Filiation to establish paternity.
  • The custodial parent can get child support even if that parent can support the child on their own.
  • Even if the two parents are living together with the child, one parent can get a child support order if the other parent refuses to help pay for the child’s bills.

HOW CHILD SUPPORT WORKS IN NEW JERSEY

What are child support services? Child support services include: locating the parent who has a duty to support your child(ren), legally determining if a person is the biological parent of your child, obtaining an order for child support and medical support services (if available at a reasonable cost), collecting support payments, keeping accurate records of payments and enforcing the support order.

Who provides these services? In New Jersey, the Department of Human Services (DHS) – Division of Family Development (DFD) – Office of Child Support Services (OCSS) (the State Title IV-D agency), County Welfare Agencies (CWA), the Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC), the County Family Divisions of the Superior Court, and County Probation Division work together to provide support services to your family.

What does the Office of Child Support Services do? The DFD/OCSS is responsible for ensuring that the state’s child support program is operated properly, efficiently and effectively, and that all of its agents are in compliance with all aspects of the Federal Law.

What does the County Welfare Agency Child Support Unit do? The CWA locates obligors and files non-support complaints on active Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) with the Family Division.

Do I Have To Pay Child Support During Summer Vacations?

By: Undisputed Legal/Child Support Process Service Department

Child support usually must be paid by the noncustodial parent when the child is with the noncustodial parent for summer vacations or long holiday breaks. Courts reason that many major expenses for the benefit of the child such as rent, mortgage, utilities, clothes, and insurance have to be paid whether the child is with the custodial parent or not. So usually a full child support payment is due, even if the child is with the noncustodial parent. 

On the other hand, the parties themselves (or the court) are free to set payments in different amounts during vacation periods when the child is with the noncustodial parent. The lower amount for vacation periods with the noncustodial parent might reflect savings to the custodial parent for food expenses or child care. 

A related issue may arise if the noncustodial parent wants to reduce child support payments to the custodial parent because the noncustodial parent has spent money on the child, such as for clothes or extracurricular activities. However, that is almost never a basis for reducing child support payments to the custodial parent, unless the parties agreed otherwise. 

Court orders or divorce settlements almost always provide that child support is to be paid in specific dollar amounts from one parent to the other. Courts do not want the complications of trying to sort out whether the parties on a particular occasion agreed to an alternative way of making child support payments. Courts also do not want the noncustodial parent unilaterally changing the method of paying child support and potentially interfering with the budget planning of the custodial parent. 

If the noncustodial parent wants to pay for clothes or extracurricular activities of the child, that is fine (and nice for the child), but the court will treat such payments as gifts to the child, not as part of the noncustodial parent’s support obligation. 

For information on serving child support papers visit www.undisputedlegal.com.  Open Monday – Friday 8am-8pm.  “When you want it done right the first time” contact undisputedlegal.com

Assignment and Cooperation With Child Support

By:Undisputed Legal Inc./Child Support Process Service Department

If you are an applicant/recipient of Temporary Assistance for the child, or Medicaid for yourself and the child, or your child is in Title IV-E Foster Care, you are required to assign to the social services district rights you have to support on your own behalf and any rights to child support on behalf of any family member for whom you are applying for, or receiving assistance. For Medicaid applicants/recipients, this assignment is limited to medical support only. When applying for, or receiving Temporary Assistance, your assignment of support rights is limited to support that accrues during the period that you or the family member receives assistance. You are required to assign these support rights and, unless you claim good cause or domestic violence for not doing so, cooperate with the Child Support Enforcement Unit to: 

Who Is Eligibility For Child Support Service

BY: Undisputed Legal Inc./Child Support Process Service Department

Any parent or non-parent caregiver acting as guardian of at least one child under the age of 21 is eligible to apply for child support services. Such person is considered the custodial parent in the child support case. If you are applying for, or receiving, Temporary Assistance (officially termed “Family Assistance” or “Safety Net Assistance”) for the child, child support services may be provided to you based on your application for this program. Child support services may also be provided if you are applying for Medicaid for yourself and the child and you complete an application/referral for child support services. Child support services will continue after you stop receiving Temporary Assistance or Medicaid unless you request your child support case be closed. Child support services are also provided for a child placed in foster care and may continue after the foster care placement ends. If the child returns to you after being discharged from foster care, child support services will continue unless you request otherwise. A child under the age of 21 or a non-custodial parent or putative (alleged) father may also apply or be eligible for child support services. 

For information on Serving Child Support Papers visit www.undisputedlegal.com.  Open Monday – Friday 8am-8pm.  “When you want it done right the first time” contact undisputedlegal.com

What is Temporary Child Support?

Temporary child support is based upon the respective incomes of the parties as adjusted by any temporary maintenance. If temporary maintenance is to be paid to a party, then, for the purpose of computing child support, the maintenance paid reduces the income of the payor and increases by the same amount the income of the payee. That is why temporary maintenance is computed before temporary child support.

For information on serving child support papers visit www.undisputedlegal.com.  Open Monday – Friday 8am-8pm.  “When you want it done right the first time” contact undisputedlegal.com

CAN I BE RESPONSIBLE FOR CHILD SUPPORT AS A STEPPARENT?

The responsibilities of a stepparent depend on state law. A stepparent usually is not required to pay child support for a spouse’s child from another marriage, unless the stepparent has adopted the child. Until then, the child’s biological parents are liable for the child’s support. Some states, however, make stepparents liable for the stepchild’s support as long as the stepparent and stepchild are living together. 

A stepparent who does not adopt a spouse’s child normally may not claim custody of the child if the marriage ends in divorce, although some states allow a stepparent to seek visitation. 

A stepchild usually does not share in the estate of a stepparent, unless the stepparent has provided for the stepchild in a will. However, an unmarried stepchild under eighteen may receive supplemental retirement benefits or survivor’s benefits under Social Security. 

For information on serving legal papers visit www.undisputedlegal.com.  Open Monday – Friday 8am-8pm.  “When you want it done right the first time” contact undisputedlegal.com

TIPS FOR COLLECTING CHILD SUPPORT?

The following is a checklist of techniques for collection of past-due child support: 

Wage withholding orders. These are entered by a court and served on the employer of the parent who owes support. (The person who owes support is called the “obligor.”) The employer sends payments to the government, which then sends support payments to the parent to whom support is owed. 

Tax refund intercepts. The government sends a notice to the Internal Revenue Service or the state department of revenue, directing that the obligor’s tax refund be sent to the government for payment of support. 

Liens on property. A lien can be placed on the real estate, automobile, or other property of the obligor. If support is not paid, the property can be confiscated and sold. Alternatively, the lien may stay on the property until it is sold by the obligor, at which point the debt must be paid before the obligor receives any proceeds from the sale.